The Ham Green Coin Hoard

In 1981 86 silver coins, buried in a salt glazed stoneware bottle, were found beneath the pantry floor of a cottage in Ham Green, Redditch. The hoard was declared Treasure and acquired by Worcestershire County Museum Service

The hoard provides a typical picture of the coinage being used in England in the middle of the seventeenth century and contains mainly shillings and sixpences, alongside two contemporary forgeries, from the reigns of Phillip and Mary (1554-58) through to coins of Charles II dating to 1661-2. It is likely then that the coins were hoarded in the early years of the reign of Charles II and it appears that the neck of the pot the coins were hidden inside had been broken in order to fit the largest coins through it.

The coins span an exciting and turbulent period in the history of our County including the First and last Battles of the Civil War, the execution of Charles I, the escape of Charles II from Worcester in 1651, and his restoration to the throne less than ten years later.

One halfcrown of Charles I struck around 1644-5 and marked with a ‘W’ depicting the mint (probably Worcester) is the product of one of a number of emergency civil war mints established by the Royalists during the Civil War to ensure that they were able to pay for their military and logistical needs at a time when the circulation of currency was compromised. A similar mint had also been established at Hartlebury Castle, the home of the Bishop of Worcester.

We’ll never know what the reason for hiding these coins were, some ten years after the Battle of Worcester and the end of the English Civil War but the stories that the coins tell are fascinating nonetheless.

 

Reference: Besley, E. Redditch Treasure Trove, Transactions of Worcestershire Archaeological Society, 1986

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